Meditation

At one point in my life, I was very challenged by my health. One day I decided to throw caution to the wind, so to speak, gave up my career and began to seek a path to healing. I remembered a friend who sold vitamins and pursued contacting her to see if those would be something I should try. Instead, I found that she no longer sold vitamins but that she did lead meditation groups. 

As with any new endeavor, I was a bit hesitant in making a long-term (8 week) commitment. I asked if I could “try” it once, and then decide. Although she said that was unusual, she agreed. 
The first meditation group I joined consisted of 7 other women, I became the 8th of the group. I loved the experience from the first hour. I was among a warm, loving and supportive group. I was learning to breathe deeply. I was learning to focus on my breath. 

I was learning to focus on ME. Wow, what a revelation. I could make time for me! Since that first meditation group in 1997, I have become a fairly avid meditator. 

I’d like to say that I meditate every day. I’d like to say that I begin my day with meditation. However, life happens and unfortunately I become a slave to my email and frequently go into my office to check it before meditation, breakfast or even getting ready for the day. Why am I sharing this? I believe meditation helps us to heal… to heal ourselves, to heal others, to heal the Universe. I believe it allows us to be more organized, focused and resolved in our purpose. But, I also believe that we are all human and by my sharing that sometimes I also don’t begin my day with meditation or even get to meditate at all some days, I am hoping I can inspire you to let go of judgment of yourself. 

Oftentimes I will speak to people about meditating. They’ll tell me that they can’t quiet their mind, they can’t take the time, they can’t breathe into their stomachs and a myriad of other comments. My response is to STOP JUDGING yourself. Even though you feel that you are not quieting your mind, it is OK. Allow what comes in during mediation to do so, think about it and release it, knowing that you will have the ability to address and resolve it at a later time. Don’t judge it or yourself. Just slowly and gently bring yourself back to a beautiful place or quiet your mind by repeating a phrase (such as “G-d, I open my heart to you, please come into my heart” or “OM” or anything else that helps you to just clear your thoughts. The same for breathing. Breathe as deeply as you can comfortably breathe. Any amount of time you spend focusing on your breath and breathing more deeply than your usual breaths, will help to relax and focus your mind. 
Again, don’t allow any room for judgment. It is what it is, and nothing else. 

No time to meditate… several meditative exercises can be done in 10 minutes. 

And, even a 5 minute break during a busy, stressful day will benefit you. Just don’t meditate in any manner while driving. 

There is information about meditation which I invite you to try. I’d love to hear your response to the suggestions and for those of you who already meditate, I’d love to hear any suggestions you have or any particular meditation practice that you would like to share.

Susan BroudeComment